Tying It All Together: 10 Steps To Precision Handloads | Top Rated Supplier of Firearm Reloading Equipment, Supplies, and Tools - Colt

Tying It All Together: 10 Steps To Precision Handloads

Tying It All Together: 10 Steps To Precision Handloads
 
Shooters reload cartridges for many reasons. Some do it to save money. Others want the personal satisfaction of firing ammunition they assembled themselves. And some find that reloading becomes an interesting hobby in itself - almost as much fun as shooting.

If you read Sinclair International's Reloading Press, the main reason you reload is probably to create the most precise, accurate, repeatable results that you and your rifle can achieve. And you've probably noticed that over the last year, we presented a series of articles on the basic steps in producing handloads for precision shooting.

The articles are a permanent part of the Sinclair "Learn" archive, but they may be a little hard to access quickly. So we thought we'd tie the whole series together here, in one article (and one link to save in your Favorites), to introduce it to new Reloading Press readers and make it easy for anybody to find.
Part 1: The first step in making high-quality handloads is to carefully choose the best brass for your application. You need to know how to identify the different types of brass and how to choose the best kind for the ammo you want to load. Read Part 1...
Part 2: Even high-quality brass can have burrs around the flash hole that can interfere with the primer flame and cause inconsistent ignition - which can lead to shot groups opening up. Flash hole deburring is a critical step in making sure primers ignite powder consistently. Read Part 2…
Part 3: The next step is to make sure the primer pockets are square and uniform. Like flash hole deburring, primer pocket uniforming helps eliminate variations in primer ignition. Read Part 3…
Part 4: Making sure all your cases are precisely the same length is crucial, especially when you use cases that have been fired before. Case trimming is the way to get there. Read Part 4...
Part 5: After trimming, cases still have to be resized. In order for them to work through the resizing die, they have to be lubricated. The case lube method you choose is crucial to making precision handloads. Read Part 5...
Part 6: Now it's time to choose the dies that will actually resize your cases. There are several different important options to consider in selecting the right sizing dies. Read Part 6...
Part 7: Wait! You're not quite ready to start sizing yet. There's yet more to consider before you start cranking cases through the press. Read Part 7...
Part 8: Once the cases are completely prepped, it's time to start putting fresh components back into them. We start off by seating primers. Read Part 8...
Part 9: After the primers are seated, it's time to drop in the powder. There are several tools that will help you handle powder for precision handloads. Read Part 9...
Part 10: The final step in the process is carefully seating the bullet to just the right depth. And then… you're ready to try your loads at the range. Read Part 10...
Roy Hill
Brownells/Sinclair Copywriter